2011/11/11

SOME LOVE POEMS FROM ANCIENT EGYPT



LOVE POEMS FROM ANCIENT EGYPT


The ancient Egyptians left behind various love poems which relate the emotions felt all those thousands of years ago. And yet, they can be read as if they apply to us in the 21st century - has anything really changed? I think not.

LOVE POEMS FROM ANCIENT EGYPT


Extract from a 3,000 year-old papyrus
.
She is one girl, there is no one like her.
She is more beautiful than any other.
Look, she is like a star goddess arising
at the beginning of a happy new year;
brilliantly white, bright skinned;
with beautiful eyes for looking,
with sweet lips for speaking;
she has not one phrase too many.
With a long neck and white breast,
her hair of genuine lapis lazuli;
her arm more brilliant than gold;
her fingers like lotus flowers,
with heavy buttocks and girt waist.
Her thighs offer her beauty,
with a brisk step she treads on ground.
She has captured my heart in her embrace.
She makes all men turn their necks
to look at her.
One looks at her passing by,
this one, the unique one
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Two more works from different periods 
my beautiful one
I wish I were part of your affairs, like a wife.
With your hand in mine
your love would be returned.
I implore my heart:
"If my true love stays away tonight,
I shall be like someone already
in the grave."
Are you not my health and my life?
How joyful is your good health
for the heart that seeks you
-----------------------------
I wish I were your mirror
so that you always looked at me.
I wish I were your garment
so that you would always wear me.
I wish I were the water that washes
your body.
I wish I were the unguent, O woman,
that I could annoit you.
And the band around your breasts,
and the beads around your neck.
I wish I were your sandal
that you would step on me!



PAYMENT FOR SERVICE AND PRODUCTS IN ِANCEINT EGYPTIANS




PAYMENT FOR SERVICE AND PRODUCTS IN  ِANCEINT EGYPTIANS






And how did one pay for all of the services and products mentioned? Well, there was no money. Rather it was essentially a system of barter. People's wages were often paid in the form of food. Standard weights were used for weighing goods to evaluate the value of particular products.
Of course, the good thing was that for the Egyptians, you could take all these possessions with you in the afterlife - that is, if you could afford to barter for a good funeral and burial



Food Production In The ِAncient Egyptians Era


Our knowledge of everyday life in ancient Egypt has been derived largely from depictions on the walls of tombs and other written records, including thousands of fragments of limestone (ostraka) from the New Kingdom which include letters, legal matters and student writing exercises. Here we look at some of the information gleaned from both these sources and artefact

Food Production In The Era Of The ِAncient Egyptians 

Food Production 
Many Old Kingdom tombs at Saqqara depict scenes of activities such as hunting, fishing and cattle herding. Small sculptures from the Old Kingdom also depict various activities such as bread and beer making

Food Production In The Era Of The ِAncient EgyptiansFood Production In The Era Of The ِAncient EgyptiansFood Production In The Era Of The ِAncient Egyptians


By the Middle Kingdom, some tombs contained wooden models of servants working in granaries, baking bread, ploughing fields and sailing boats. One major wooden model in the Cairo Museum shows a landowner seated under a canopy with his officials as his stock are paraded past him .  Other models illustrate workers weaving and fishing with nets suspended between boats.In the New Kingdom tombs of officials and craftsmen, scenes often show fields being harvested, followed by the winnowing and threshing of grain.



Food Production In The Era Of The ِAncient Egyptians

Food Production In The Era Of The ِAncient Egyptians

Food Production In The Era Of The ِAncient Egyptians

Food Production In The Era Of The ِAncient Egyptians

Scribes are sometimes depicted in such scenes noting the quantities of grain for the purpose of taxation. In return, the administration oversaw the construction of irrigation canals and dykes to make best use of the annual flooding of the Nile.
Grape-picking is shown in some paintings and the tomb of Sennefer, an 18th-dynasty mayor of Thebes (modern Luxor), has a large part of its ceiling painted to depict vines and clusters of grapes. Grapes were eaten and also used for wine production, the best quality coming from the Delta region.Many types of vegetables were included in the diet, some being onions, garlic, melons and peas. They also ate plenty of fish, ducks, pigeons, geese and quail.



MUSIC IN ANCIENT EGYPTIAN


MUSIC IN ANCIENT EGYPTIAN





Music was obviously enjoyed, judging by the many paintings of musicians playing at banquets. Instruments included tambourines, oboes, lutes and harps.  Female dancers and musicians are shown in some New Kingdom paintings wearing only their jewellery .Music and song would have played a large role in the rituals of temples in ancient Egypt .

 
 














 











































































































































































Health and Cosmetics In ancient Egyptian


With the dusty conditions often encountered in Egypt, the appearance and cleanliness were important. Hair was often short and wigs made of human hair would be worn for special occasions bronze mirrors were used when applying makeup. The one on the left has a handle to the image of the goddess Hathor. Examples of cosmetic containers, such as the one on the right, to survive in graves. Kohl, an eye-based paint powder of galena (lead ore), and copper oxide green, has been used around the eyes and applied with a stick applicator.

Clothing was usually in the form of simple linen tunics were woven very finely. Nature of light was perfect for hot weather. Sandals were made ​​from woven palm fronds.

Physicians were well respected in ancient Egypt and surgeons used various knives, pliers and needles.

Surviving medical papyri list many treatments for diseases suffered by the Egyptians. Honey was often applied to wounds, however, not all treatments sounds like they would have a better feel. For example, eat a dead mouse to cure a bad cough can be a bit daunting.











DWELLINGS AND HOUSES IN ANCEIENT EGYPTIAN

DWELLINGS AND HOUSES IN ANCEIENT EGYPTIAN 




Whilst temples, the houses of the gods, were built of stone to last, the homes of ancient Egyptians were made of mud-brick - even the palace of the pharaoh - as these were not intended to last forever.  Supports for the roof were in the form of palm logs and wood was usually used for doorways





  Houses in the towns could be multi-storey to make the most of limited land. Homes would have been sparsely furnished.  Some of the country villas of the rich were equipped with gardens and a decorative pool in which sweet-smelling lotus flowers would grow. The pool also was stocked with fish from the Nile. Palm trees would have provided welcome shade in the hot summers.  At the site of Deir el-Medina  in Upper Egypt, one can see the lower walls and preserved layout of a New Kingdom village. It was inhabited by the workers who built the royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings



 


Craftsmen in Ancient Egypt

Various tradesmen were required to meet the demand for manufacturing furniture and other items for both the home and the tomb, the house of eternity. While Egyptian houses were sparsely furnished, the standard of work seen in surviving furniture from wealthy tombs can be very high. Carpenters used saws, wooden mallets, chisels and a tool called an adze for carving wood, as seen at left in an ancient model of a workshop in the Cairo Museum.
Egypt's craftsmen also produced statues, amulets and various other items from bronze. One preserved illustration shows the production of a stone statue of a pharaoh by men involved in polishing the stone, painting and carving hieroglyphs.




 





Superb gold and silver work has been found that has been worked to perfection by jewellers. They also made necklaces containing elements made of faience (a glazed material) that were molded to look like flowers, leaves and fruit.  Men and women often wore large decorative earrings
Artists painted some beautiful scenes in tombs but, like sculptors, they were mainly anonymous craftsmen rather than artists producing art for art's sake. Very few names of artists survive, although the style of someone's work is sometimes recognisable to experts