2012/03/22

Pair of Castanets

Pair of Castanets




This pair of ivory castanets is in the form of human arms wearing bracelets; castanets were popular ancient Egyptian musical instruments.

These were carved from a single hippopotamus tusk, split in half.

The assembly holes at the upper end show that the clappers were tied together and held in one hand.

Sound was produced by clapping them together.

They are inscribed with the names of Queen Tiye and Princess Meritaten, who was Tutankhamun's sister-in-law.

Alabaster Vase of King Tutankhamun


The one-handled vase with a bulging body, high narrow neck, and a graceful spout is one of many traditional and simply formed containers found in the tomb of King Tutankhamun.
Alabaster Vase of King Tutankhamun

It was used to store oils and other materials for the deceased king to use in the afterlife. The vase was made from alabaster, which could be carved with great skill.

Staff with Tutankhamun's Names

Staff with Tutankhamun's Names


This long staff of King Tutankhamun is completely covered with gold. It has decorations of glass inlays at the top and beneath the handhold, which is formed like an open lotus flower.

Staff with Tutankhamun's Names


Hieroglyphic text, written from left to right in gold against a blue background, states the king's names and titles. The end of this staff is decorated with cloisonne feather designs.

Three Wine Jar Seals


The three seals were used as stoppers for three large pottery jars, which contained a residue of evaporated wine.













The seals are made of rush and mud and are inscribed in relief with the source and quality of the wine. The writing on two of them say "sweet wine from the house of Aten life."

 These wine-jar seals enable us to make a list of the various vineyards and the qualities of wine at that time. It also provides proof that wine was consumed and that the wine industry was important in Ancient Egypt.

Child's Spinning Toy

Child's Spinning Toy


Child's Spinning Toy



The example of a spinning toy is very much the same as children's toys of modern times. The Ancient Egyptians made delightful toys from wood, bone, ivory, ceramics, and stone.

Little children played with dolls, toy animals, spinning toys, and mechanical toys such as crocodiles with moving jaws and Jumping Jacks, human figures whose arms and legs would move in bouncing motions.

The Vase of Ointment with Hieratic Inscription


The small vase with a short narrow body and a flat rim is one of many vases used especially for storing ointments. It still contains the ointment, which was preserved for a very long time.


The small size of the lid indicates that it did not belong to this vase. The hieratic writing in black ink on the vase describes the contents.

The Double Vase of King Tutankhamun

The Double Vase of King Tutankhamun

This double vase of King Tutankhamun has two handles, a high foot, bulging belly, short neck, and wide rim. It shows the expertise of the ancient Egyptian workers in carving alabaster vessels.


Like many other alabaster vessels found in the tomb of Tutankhamun, this double vase held oils and ointments for the use of the deceased king in the afterlife.

Wooden Scribe's Palette


Tutankhamun's tomb contained a whole set of votive palettes and a full set of writing equipment for a scribe. Possessing a palette of Thoth, protector of scribes and magicians, associated the deceased with Thoth and his immense powers.


Wooden Scribe's Palette


This palette is made from a simple piece of wood. One of the two round hollows in the wood still contains nuggets of red ink. Six reed pens are packed into a narrow slot. The king's cartouche is carved on one side.

Chair with Carved Back

Chair with Carved Back


Chair with Carved Back


This wooden chair has a finely carved back. The back consists of a scene representing Heh, the god of a million years and eternity.

Heh is always represented in a crouching position raising his hands to the sky.

On the sides there are the Sema-Tawy, signs of unification. The chair is decorated from the top with the winged solar disk, sign of Horus, the god of Edfu.

The legs of the chair are in the shape of lion's paws to give power to its owner.

Stool Decorated with Plants Signifying Union of Egypt

Stool Decorated with Plants Signifying Union of Egypt




The stool belonged to King Tutankhamun when he was a child. The feet, in the form of lion's paws, are made of wood painted white.

Between them is a gilded openwork wooden decoration in the form of lotus and papyrus entwined around the hieroglyphic sign Sema, which signifies the "Union of the Two Lands." A cushion would have been placed on the curved seat.

Chair with Papyrus Decoration

Chair with Papyrus Decoration


Chair with Papyrus Decoration



By the New Kingdom, Egyptians used a large number of different types of stools, the most common of which were lattice stools.

This wooden chair had a seat made of lattice covered with a layer of papyrus, which is now missing, as visible on the chair back.

The legs of the chair are made of ebony to look like an animal's legs to give power to the owner. The paws are inlaid with ivory with angled braces to support the seat.

Flask with the Nile God

Flask with the Nile God

Flask with the Nile God


This is one of the household items once used in the royal palace. It is a flask showing the Nile god, represented as a human figure with a big belly and breasts.

He is wearing a crown adorned with the lotus, the emblem of Upper Egypt, and the papyrus, symbol of Lower Egypt. The Nile god is holding a flask decorated with hieroglyphic text giving the name of King Tutankhamun.

Scribe's Palette with Four Reeds

Scribe's Palette with Four Reeds


Scribal equipment typically consists of reed pens contained in a small case and two cups for red and black ink, respectively, or a palette that combines two hollows for the inks and a slot for the pens.


The palette from Tutankhamun's collection has four reed pens in their long slot and two hollows for the ink.

The palette is adorned at the top with a hieroglyphic inscription of the king's titles.

Vase of Two Pieces, One Fitting Over the Other

Vase of Two Pieces, One Fitting Over the Other

This alabaster jar had the stopper and lid removed by tomb robbers. The jar was used as a container for oils, fats, and other materials. It bears the fingerprints of thieves on its interior wall. The vase is of two pieces; one of openwork that fits over the other.

Vase of Two Pieces, One Fitting Over the Other

When the tomb was later tidied up, empty vessels were employed as containers for smaller objects, which had been scattered by the robbers. This jar bears also a cryptograph, or secret sign, of the name of the King Neb Kheprew Re.

The Sandals of King Tutankhamun




King Tutankhamun have a hundred pairs of sandals found in his tomb and it was made from many materials such as :


The Sandals of King Tutankhamun

The Sandals of King Tutankhamun

The Sandals of King Tutankhamun



The Sandals of King Tutankhamun

The Sandals of King Tutankhamun

The Sandals of King Tutankhamun





The Corselet of Tutankhamun

The Corselet of Tutankhamun

The Corselet of Tutankhamun

This corselet, or vest, is a magnificent piece of jewelry considered to be a royal and official article of clothing, depicted in relief and sculpture throughout the Egyptian history.

In the New Kingdom, this corselet appears especially in divine portrayal, decorated with feather patterns and always worn with the short, close-fitting kilt.

Tutankhamun's corselet is made of two rectangles of stylized feathers, divided into rows of alternating blue turquoise, lapis lazuli, golden chevrons, or inverted V's, and triangles of red glass.

The front of the collar depicts the king before Amun, lord of Karnak; Atum, the god of creation in Heliopolis; and the vulture-headed goddess Iusaas, wearing the double crown and extending reeds of millions of years to the king.

Serving as counterpoise, on the rear of the collar is a similar pendant, composed of a scarab, flanked by two uraei, or cobras.

Tutankhamun Box for Unguents

Box for Unguents of King Tutankhamun

Tutankhamun Box for Unguents



This double-sided ointment container of gold-plated wood is inlaid with colored glass paste.

Each side is composed of two inward-facing cartouches containing the figure of the king squatting on the Heb, or festival, sign.

The four images of the king differ slightly and have been interpreted as showing him in different stages of his life.

The lid is adorned with the sun disk and double plumes; the base is plated with silver and decorated with a frieze of Ankh, or life, signs.

Tutankhamun's Model Boat


The 35 model boats found in the Treasury Room of Tutankhamun's tomb indicate a wide variety in the form and design of actual boats and ships.


The Model Boat

Most of the models were probably connected with the pilgrimage to Abydos or one that would take place in the hereafter. Some boats would allow the deceased to accompany Osiris and Re, others would allow him to travel and take part in hunting in the marshes.