2012/03/28

Statue of Isis, Mother of Tuthmosis the Third

Statue of Isis, Mother of Tuthmosis the Third




Queen Isis was a secondary wife of Tuthmosis the Second and the mother of Tuthmosis the Third.

After his father's death, King Tuthmosis the Third honored his mother by making this statue identifying the queen with the mother goddess Isis. He also gave her the epithets reserved for the great royal wives on the base of this statue.

It should be noted that the name of the god Amun was re-inscribed after it had been erased during the Amarna period

The Granite Sphinx of Queen Hatshepsut

The Granite Sphinx of Queen Hatshepsut




The sphinx of Queen Hatshepsut is carved in a fairly classical pose. The front legs extend forward and the tail curls around the right hind leg.

This sphinx is a portrait of Hatshepsut with the elegant feminine features of all her statues: almond-shaped eyes under arched brows, a fine aquiline or hooked nose, and a small smiling mouth.

Writing on the chest reads, "Maatkare, Beloved of Amun, may life be given forever."

The Queen Hatshepsut Offering to Osiris

The Queen Hatshepsut Offering to Osiris



On this flake, the artist intended to show respect for the queen's majesty and drew her as a masculine figure, kneeling and wearing the Khepresh helmet-like crown of ceremonies. She is offering two jars of wine and cool water to the god Osiris of the underworld (not shown).

The queen wears a collar and a short kilt fastened with a belt. The text refers to "Maat-Ka-Ra (the throne name of Hatshepsut) beloved of Osiris," and "offering wine and cool water". The drawing is brightly colored and the primarily red sketch lines, and some corrections in the proportions are shown.

Head of Queen Hatshepsut

Head of Queen Hatshepsut



Queen Hatshepsut is the most famous female ruler of ancient Egypt.

This head, which is one of the masterpieces of Eighteenth Dynasty sculpture, is part of a statue that once represented the queen in the shape of the god Osiris.

The head, made out of painted limestone, bears all her distinctive feminine features: the gently curved eyebrows, the wide eyes extended by cosmetic lines, the delicate aquiline nose, the full cheeks, and the gracious mouth.

The Standing Statue of Hatshepsut

The Standing Statue of Hatshepsut




Queen Hatshepsut is portrayed standing in a prayful pose with her left leg forward. Her feminine features are obvious in her big eyes, plump cheeks, and small mouth. 

She wears the Nemes headdress with a uraeus, or royal cobra, and the Shendyt kilt so that she would be accepted by the Egyptians, whose traditions demanded a male ruler.

The queen stands on the nine bows, thus, portraying her control over foreign countries. Her name and titles are inscribed on the base as "The king of Upper and Lower Egypt, Maat-ka-Re, may she live forever."

Queen Hatshepsut ruled Egypt for about 20 prosperous and peaceful years. The statue was destroyed into many parts in the time of her successor, King Tuthmosis the Third. It was restored in modern times.

The Limestone Sphinx of Queen Hatshepsut

The Limestone  Sphinx of Queen Hatshepsut



Hatshepsut ruled as a man, not as a woman, and for this reason her royal protocols and titles are always written without the feminine qualification, which is the "T" letter in the hieroglyphic. This is the case in the text inscribed on the base of this sphinx where it is written, "Beloved of the god Amun, endowed with life forever."

In spite of her typical representation as a man, she is shown here with feminine facial features, especially in the full cheeks and lips. However, she has a long false beard like all male pharaohs. The name Hatshepsut is inscribed on the royal cartouche between the forelegs of the sphinx. The body is painted yellow except for the mane. The false beard and the ears are painted blue.

This sphinx of Queen Hatshepsut is somewhat different from the traditional Egyptian sphinx, which was a human head with a lion's body. This sphinx has a human face, a lion's head with mane and ears, and a lion's body. It is made in the same style as the sphinxes of the Middle Kingdom found in Tanis, which have Asiatic features. This sphinx, however, has the beautiful features of Queen Hatshepsut.