2012/04/09

Head of Nefertiti

Head of Nefertiti

Head of Nefertiti


This is one of the prettiest representations of Queen Nefertiti.

Made out of quartzite, the head once belonged to a composite statue assembled from several separately carved pieces.

Head of Akhenaten

Head of Akhenaten




King Akhenaten made religious and social reforms and changed the Amun-Re cult into that of the Aten.

This statue was once a part of a standing statue depicting the king with his head topped by feathers, symbol of Maat and Aten.

Akhenaten appears here with his characteristic features that include long, tapering half-closed eyes with heavy eyelids, long delicate nose, immense protruding mouth, exaggerated chin, harsh musculature, long ears with pierced lobes, and two outlined wrinkle lines on the neck.

Part of a ring with the name of Akhenaten

Part of a ring with the name of Akhenaten









Lower part of a blue-glazed faience ring, inscribed in hieroglyphs with the name of Akhenaten, from el-`Amarna, the city he founded in Middle Egypt as Residence and centre of the sun-cult. Such rings were found across the city in large numbers, and must have been issued on a grand scale.


Heads of Nefertiti and Akhenaten

Heads of Nefertiti and Akhenaten



This sculptor's model consists of two heads of individuals facing one another. Taking note of the elongated form of the heads, the elongated eyes, large ears and fleshy lips, all characteristics of Amarna art, it seems likely that it represents the royal couple of Nefertiti and Akhenaten. A study of a left hand can be observed above the head of the latter.

Head of a shabti of Akhenaten

Head of a shabti of Akhenaten





This head of a shabti displays all the features of the face of Akhenaten. It wears the 'afnet' hair style, a head cover which expands into a round bag-shape at the back of the head and normally furnished with an end piece which is not present in this example. The head of the large uraeus is also missing. Shabtis found in the tomb of Akhenaten at El -`Amarna show that these funerary statuettes no longer bore the text of chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead. This change is consistent with the innovative theology of the 'heretic king', who refrained from all mentions of Osiris, the god of the Hereafter par excellence.