2012/11/30

King Tut Mystery

Ever since a 1968 X-ray of tutankhamun’s  skull revealed signs of a severe blow to his  head, Egyptologists have wondered whether  he was murdered. Who might have killed the  boy king, and why? cutting-edge technology has (almost)  put the mystery to rest. tutankhamun was  almost certainly not murdered. He probably  died from a terrible infection that set in after  he broke his leg.  in January 2005, a computed tomography  (ct) scanner, donated by its manufacturer,  Siemens, and the national geographic Society, scanned the insides of tut’s mummy. 

King Tut Mystery

King Tut Mystery

King Tut Mystery


It recorded more than 1,700 images in five  minutes. Since tutankhamun is in such bad  shape, the scanner came right to his tomb in  the Valley of the Kings, in a specially-outfitted truck.  Analysis of the scanned images revealed  that the king had broken his leg just days  before he died. not even the best royal doctors could save him from the infection that  likely resulted.  Dr. Zahi Hawass, secretary general of  the Egyptian Supreme council of Antiquities, personally supervised the ct scan of  tutankhamun’s mummy.

He said,  “i believe  these results will close the case of tutankhamun, and the king will not need to be examined again. We should now leave him at rest.” given the terrible condition of the boy  king’s mummy, Egyptologists can be forgiven for not being sure about tut’s fate. Howard  carter, who discovered tut’s tomb in 1922,  was eager to separate the king’s mummy  from its fabulous gold mask, jewelry, and  other treasures. But the ancient glues used  in the mummification process gripped tight.  carter broke poor tut in half, separated his  head from his body, and broke the body into  more than a dozen pieces. He even took the  remains of the king outdoors and lit a fire  beneath them to try to loosen the resin glue. 

 the continued interest in tut is making  for a very active afterlife for him. the boy  king can now personally greet visitors to  his tomb from his comfortable resting place  in an airtight glass case, specially filtered  to keep fungi, molds, and microorganisms  from growing. only his face is visible. His  broken body is tastefully covered.