2013/05/25

Tutankhamun Boomerang Model

Bows and arrows found in the tomb of Tutankhamun.Carter found numerous weapons such as bows, arrows, throwing sticks and boomerangs in the Annex to the grave. Along with these instruments were real models.


This boomerang, found in a box with several models of wood, is one such model. Carved ivory and wearing gold, it would be too delicate for frequent use, and the terminal apartment is atypical for a boomerang. The inscription refers to Tutankhamun as "the God, Lord of the Two Lands," Ra is the Lord of events ", beloved of Ptah, which is south of his wall."
Tutankhamun Boomerang Model



The boomerang was used in ancient Egypt in all periods primarily to hunt game in the marshes. Scenes from owners of graves, about to launch the weapon, were part of the directory of artists from the Old Kingdom (2700-2150 BC). A representation of the king hunting on the left side of the golden altar. There, Tutankhamun is in a skiff of papyrus in the swamps, the boomerang in his right hand and birds caught in the left hand.  


While this scene may reflect an activity which he hopes to include in the above, it is possible that the action of the game hunting may represent the triumph of evil King of the inhabitants of the marsh. The boomerang model would have a magical significance as a ritual weapon with Tutankhamun overcome the obstacles he would face in his journey to the afterlife.

Penannular alabaster ear-ring

Penannular alabaster ear-ring


Penannular alabaster ear-ring



Characteristic New Kingdom form of ear-ring, in Egyptian alabaster, from el-Amarna, the city founded in Middle Egypt as Residence and centre of the sun-cult under Akhenaten.


Tutankhamun Serpent Head Amulet

Serpent Head Amulet of Tutankhamun


Although it is generally known as the serpent head, this type of amulet always includes the front part of the serpent's body as well as the head. It is first found in painted representations on the wooden coffins of the Middle Kingdom, where its name is given in two slightly different spellings, Menqebyt and, less commonly, Menqeryt. It is accompanied by the direction that it is to be worn on the neck. Many of the amulets in the wrappings of mummies were placed in positions prescribed in the Book of the Dead and in the earlier texts from which it was compiled. For example, Chapter 162, which is a spell for restoring warmth to the head of a dead person, is followed by the directions: "To be recited over a figure of a cow made of fine gold and put on the neck of the deceased."

Tutankhamun Serpent Head Amulet

The serpent head is, however, not among the amulets for which particulars of material and location are given in the Book of the Dead, which may explain why the known examples are made of several different stones and even of gold and ivory. But the great majority are made of carnelian. It is the material used for this fine specimen found on Tutankhamun's mummy, suspended on gold wire and lying on the left side of the throat, in accordance with the instruction given on the Middle Kingdom coffins. The suspension wire was threaded through a tubular eyelet at the top of a gold cap that was fitted over the base of the amulet. Gold is also used for the outline of the eye sockets; the eyes themselves are an overlay of quartz with the pupil painted underneath.

Three chapters in the Book of the Dead (Chapters 33-35) are devoted to preserving the deceased owner from suffering injury from snakes and the serpent head has been connected with them, but the name Menqebyt conveys the notion of something cool. The position of the amulet on the throat would have no obvious significance if its purpose were to ward off snakes, whereas ensuring cool refreshment for the throat seems a much more probable function.

Tile with flower decoration

Tile with flower decoration

This tile formed part of the wall decoration of the great palace at El-`Amarna. It shows a vegetative decoration of plant stems, blue flax flowers, and separate inlaid flowers of Anthemis pseudocotula, which has white leaves and yellow flower heads.

Tile with flower decoration

The Rail Museum of Cairo

Trains are a key means of transportation, why not learn a little about while waiting to board a train station in Cairo. Many of us use the train every now and then to move from one place to another. Some people use the subway every day to go to work in Egypt, which is itself a modern train system. Not that you asked, while traveling by train, who invented this machine is complex, with no idea of ​​the train comes from, and what did the first train look like? You can find answers to all these questions and more in the Railway Museum in Cairo.






Located in the far right side of the capital of a railway station in Ramses Square, located in the Railway Museum. There is a vast difference between the atmosphere and ocean in the world inside the museum. Clearly heard the noise and cars and trains, people screaming outside. This is because it is Ramses and one of the most congested areas in Cairo. However, inside the museum, everything seemed calm and completely as if we still live in the old days. Even the staff working there look as if they belong to the last century.Was established Railway Museum in 1933. Was completed in October 26, 1932 and opened in January 15, 1933. Originally to celebrate the international railway conference held in the same year in Cairo. This allowed the members of the Conference of the experience of the first railway museum in the Middle East.The museum contains more than 700 pieces of models, in addition to a set of statistical documents and maps that show the development of means of transport during the past decades. Therefore, the Railway Museum at the Institute of the most important to collect information about transportation in the Middle East.



The History of Railway

James Watt's invention of the steam engine in the seventeenth century was the major motive for scientists to think of inventing a machine to enhance transportation means. William Murdoch was the first to invent a pioneer train wagon in England in 1784. After this attempt, many scientists tried to invent useful trains. One of them was Richard Nerfietik, who tried in 1814 to build the first railway route in history in the south of Wales, but the rails were not strong enough to hold his wagon "Catch Me If You Can” and they broke down. In 1825, George Stephenson was able to use his wagon “locomotion” to transport passengers from Seketon to Lingenton in England. The attempt was so successful that it encouraged the owners of the train to build another route from Liverpool to Manchester. This was truly the first railway ever invented. After its success in England, other countries all over the world started building trains and routes. The United States built its first railway in 1830 and other European countries started building their routes in 1832.




Railways in Egypt

The first railway built in Africa was in Egypt in 1853. The idea of building a railway goes back to 1833 when Mohamed Ali consulted his Scottish chief Engineer, T. Gallway, about building a route between Suez and Ain Shames to become the link between Europe and India. Mohamed Ali started initiating the project as he bought the rails in order to start building the route and the stations. However, France was able to prevent this from happening because the French government wanted to substitute this project with building a canal between the Red and the Mediterranean Seas. Mohamed Ali found himself shattered between the two ideas, so he refused to carry out any of them.

When Mohamed Ali died in 1849, England wrote to his successor, Abass Helmy I, asking him to build a railway in Egypt. He agreed and he signed a contract with Robert Stephenson, on the 12th of June, 1851. The contract asserted that the work should start in September of the same year and that Stephenson should be responsible for all the matters of the project.

The first railway route in Egypt was built in 1854, between Alexandria and Kafer Eassa, and it reached Cairo in 1856. In 1858, the route between Cairo and Suez was built, but it was taken off in the year 1878 after digging the Suez Canal. A new route was built in 1867 to connect Cairo with southern Egypt and Imbaba Bridge was built in 1891 to enable the trains to pass over the Nile near Cairo. And from this point on, the railway has become one of the most important means of transportation in Egypt. You can use the railway to go as far as Matrouh in the west and as far as Aswan in the north. Passengers can depend on the railway service to travel all over Egypt.



The museum mainly consists of five sections

Transportation before steam engines section: This section demonstrates the evolution of transportation from the period of the pharaohs until the invention of steam engines. It has interesting models of the ancient boats that the pharaohs used. This is besides other models and pictures of wooden horse wagons that the pharaohs used in transportation and in the army as well. Ancient gadgets that were vital for the pharaohs are also displayed to show how civilized these people were.

The trains section: The second section is the train section, which is considered the most important in the museum. It shows the development of trains from the first ever built wagon till the modern trains that we use in the present time.

The stations sections: Includes many models of train stations all over Egypt.

The bridges section: It contains models of all railway bridges all over Egypt. Pictures on the walls demonstrate the notion of the bridge and how men thought of it. The story says that there was a monkey who twisted his leg and wasn’t able to pass the river to go and eat from a tree. Each monkey held the legs of the other monkey in his hands and they all together constructed a bridge. The wounded monkey was able to pass the river moving on the bodies of his friends. When men saw this happening, they started to think of building bridges in order to help them pass rivers and seas.

The airplane section: This section gives a brief history of the development of airplanes from Wright till the present day. The section contains information about the airplane motors as well.

Pictures Museum:


 
















The Lamp Support

The Lamp Support



The Lamp Support



Made of gilded bronze, two of the four lamps that were found are in the form of an upright Ankh, or life, sign with arms that support a tubular torch holder.

The lamp support shown here still contains a torch of twisted linen with one end resting in the torch holder, which contained the oil to keep the torch lit.