2014/03/15

Tutankhamun Bed represented with God Bes

Bed Of King Tutankhamun with openwork figured footboard represented with God Bes



It was discovered in the Antechamber of the tomb of King Tutankhamun. It may have been a truly functional piece of domestic furniture. It has the characteristic curved shape, with a mattress of woven plant fibres covered with lime wash between the main frames. This curve provides better blood circulation for the sleeper. It is made of ebony and has lion's legs and feet resting on a rounded base.

Tutankhamun Bed represented with God Bes

 Its most notable feature is the footboard. It has three similar panels surrounded by a religious formula, which includes prayers to the king to have life, stability, prosperity and all health like Re forever.



Each panel contains three figures in openwork centrally the god Bes, a leonine dwarf with a lotus headdress, a domestic deity charged to protect the home, he is flanked by two rampant lions with similar headdress, their front paws resting on Sa-signs signifying protection. These finely carved figures are covered in part with gold leaf and all have tongues of pink-stained ivory. Here is powerful protection for whoever slept on this bed. 



In between the panels, there is a depiction of papyrus flowers head to head.

Hapy, God of the Nile

Egyptian Gods and Goddesses - Hapy

Hapy, God of the Nile



His Appearance was Man with a pot belly, shown with water plants. Hapy was the god of the innundation. Hapy was especially important to the ancient Egyptians because he brought the flood every year. The flood deposited rich silt on the banks of the Nile, allowing the Egyptians to grow crops

The yearly innundation of the Nile was essential to the Egyptians. Hapy the God of the Nile was worshipped universally, but especially at the First Cataract, Elephantine. At Elephantine, the first evidence of the Nile flood could be seen.


Hapy, God of the Nile

Hapy, God of the Nile

Hapy, God of the Nile


Hapy was personification of the Nile. He lived in a cave near the Nile cataracts above Elephantine. He controlled the yearly innundation that flooded the land with rich soil and nutrients.

The flood of the Nile filled up the green band of cultivation like a basin of water. If too much water flowed the villages that were built on the normal edge of the cultivation, of flood level, would be flooded and the planting of the crops would be delayed, and thus the harvest would be smaller.
   
If there was too little water, the river basin would not fill to normal levels and many fields would not receive the life giving nutrients and the size of the harvest would be diminished. Hapy's cult centers were both in Upper Egypt at Gebel el Silsila and Elephantine.

His priests were involved in rituals to ensure the steady levels of flow required from the annual flood. At Elephantine the official nileometer, a measuring device, was carefully monitored to predict the level of the flood, and his priests must have been intimately concerned with its monitoring.

He is depicted as a man with rolls of fat and pendulous breasts, wearing a crown of reeds and lotus blooms.