2014/10/04

Meri re and his wife Baket amun are shown adoring Osiris

Meri re and his wife Baket-amun are shown adoring Osiris

In the upper register Meri-re and his wife Baket-amun are shown adoring Osiris, who is enthroned inside a chapel. For this, they have amassed a pile of offerings among which are many flower bouquets. Above the couple is an inscription reading: "Adoration of (the sun god) Re-Harakhty and of Osiris.

May he grant a funerary offering of all good and pure things to the overseer of the royal tutors, the royal scribe of the Lord of the Two Lands, the manager of the estates of the good god (= the Pharaoh) and overseer of the treasury, Meri-re and the mistress of the house, [Baket-amun]".

Meri re and his wife Baket-amun are shown adoring Osiris

The legend next to the figure of Osiris reads: "Osiris, the great god, the ruler of the Ennead of gods, may he grant joy at the 'Place of Truth' (in the hereafter)". The lower register is a representation of the adoration of the sun god by the overseer of the treasury.

The human figures have been represented dressed according to the elegant fashion of their time with extravagant wigs and translucent pleated garments. The lady is wearing an unguent cone on her head.<BR>For a long time the tomb of Meri-re was considered to be lost.

A few years ago it was rediscovered by Alain-Pierre Zivie, who has provided the following information. In the first phase, the walls were decorated with paintings, and in the second phase the walls were covered with limestone slabs which received reliefs and inscriptions.




Meri-re receiving mortuary offerings

The overseer of the treasury Meri-re, who is shown here receiving mortuary offerings, appears in the prestigious role of royal instructor. In his lap sits a royal prince to whom he is offering fruit. Both teacher and pupil are dressed in pleated garments. 



Meri-re receiving mortuary offerings

Meri-re receiving mortuary offerings


The prince is wearing a cone of ointment on his head, which has the lock of youth, a tuft or a tress hanging from the side of his otherwise bare head. The inscription names the prince as Si-atum, a name which is known from the relevant period only from one other source.


Cartouches of Sethos I

The fragment shows two vertical cartouches of Sethos I. The texts were executed in raised relief, as were the borders to the left, right and in between the two columns.


Cartouches of Sethos I

 The text mentions the nomens.  The provenance is unclear. It may come from a door jamb. The painting may not be original.

Ramesses II with his mother

Relief depicting Ramesses II with his mother. They are both bearing offerings to Osiris who is seated on a throne on the left. Only one arm and both legs of the god have been preserved. Ramesses is wearing the blue crown, a short kilt with bead pendants and a long garment reaching his ankles.

Ramesses II with his mother


In his hands, held up in a gesture of adoration, Ramesses is holding an incense burner and a washing basin. Between him and Osiris is an offering stand with a wash basin and a large lotus flower on it. Tuya is wearing the vulture head-dress and a long flowing garment. In her hands she is holding a hes-vase and a sistrum.